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Live updates: No changes to race leaders

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Published: Apr. 6, 2021 at 8:00 AM AKDT|Updated: 6 hours ago
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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) - Alaska’s News Source is bringing you the latest municipal election news as it happens. All live updates will be posted here as results come in.

April 16 — 5 p.m.

Updated results show no change to election leaders

Race leaders in the Anchorage Municipal Election are still holding steady according to newly updated unofficial election results from the Municipal Clerk’s Office.

Dave Bronson still leads the mayoral race, and he and candidate Forrest Dunbar are likely headed for a May 11 runoff. The April 6 election is set to be certified on April 20.

Read the full updated results on the Alaska’s News Source election results page.

April 16 — 4:03 p.m.

Election commission meets to review ballots

The city’s municipal election commission held a work session Friday afternoon to review all pending rejected ballots and officially adopt the election canvass report for the April 6 municipal election.

This work session was to be followed be a public session of canvass for the commission to make final decisions on whether to accept challenged or preliminarily rejected ballot envelopes. These sessions are held for each municipal election.

READ MORE: Ballot envelope review for Anchorage municipal election taking place Friday

April 15 — 5:32 p.m.

Updated results show no change in race leaders

Updated unofficial election results from the Anchorage Municipal Clerk’s office show no change in race leaders so far. Mayoral candidate Dave Bronson continues to lead fellow candidate and current Anchorage Assembly member Forrest Dunbar.

Bronson has 24,467 of the votes counted so far, or 33%, compared to Dunbar’s 22,960, or 31% of the vote. Neither hold the 45% of the vote necessary to avoid a runoff election. That election will become official when the April 6 Municipal Election is certified by the assembly on April 20.

The likely runoff election is set for May 11.

The leaders in the race for seat B on the Anchorage School Board continue to be separated by a slim margin. Candidate Kelly Lessens holds 25,266 votes, just 252 more than opponent Judy Eledge.

In the race for seat E on the school board, leader Pat Higgins has 21,338 votes to Sami Graham’s 20,943, a margin of 395.

Election officials have counted more than 75,000 ballots so far.

April 14 — 7:28 p.m.

APOC denies expedited consideration of Dunbar campaign’s complaint

As the likely runoff in this year’s Anchorage Municipal Election approaches – with the top two candidates for mayor of Anchorage taking part – a complaint filed by one campaign against the other will not see expedited consideration, following a determination from the Alaska Public Offices Commission on Wednesday.

The campaign for candidate and Anchorage Assembly member Forrest Dunbar, who is currently sitting in second in the mayoral race, filed the complaint with APOC on Monday alleging race leader Dave Bronson’s campaign violated campaign finance regulations. The complaint makes claims such as certain expenses not being reported, over-the-limit contributions going unreturned, underreporting of expenditures and failure to provide details on media, advertising and consulting expenses.

The Bronson campaign has called the complaint a “distraction,” and said in an email to Alaska’s News Source on Tuesday evening that Dunbar’s actions — and those of his campaign — “reflect the current state of our city and its leaders.”

READ MORE: APOC denies expedited consideration of Dunbar campaign’s complaint

April 14 — 5:05 p.m.

Bronson maintains lead, while 2 school board races remain close

Updated election results released by the Anchorage Municipal Clerk’s office Wednesday show Bronson’s lead over Dunbar has grown to 1,473 votes. He holds just over 33% of the total vote counted so far, while Dunbar holds 31% of the vote. Neither has earned the 45% of the vote necessary to avoid a runoff election.

That likely runoff will become official when the Anchorage Assembly certifies the April 6 election in a meeting on April 20. Once official, the runoff will take place on May 11.

Meanwhile, a close race continues to play out for seat B on the Anchorage School Board between leaders Kelly Lessens and Judy Eledge. Lessens holds 25,070 of the votes counted so far and a slim 269-vote lead over Eledge.

Only 410 votes separate Pat Higgins, the current leader in the race for the school board’s seat E, and fellow candidate Sami Graham.

Only two of the major propositions that were on the ballot appear to be failing. The first is Proposition one, for areawide facilities capital improvement projects, and the other is Proposition eight, for Anchorage Metropolitan Police Service Area bonds.

Another police-related proposition, however, is passing according to the preliminary results. Proposition 4 asked voters to support the replacement of aging technology for the Anchorage Police Department, and would also supply the department with body cameras. That proposition is currently passing with more than 39,000 “yes” votes to 33,472 “no” votes.

April 13 — 5:35 p.m.

Updated results show little change among races

New election results released Tuesday by the Anchorage municipal clerk’s office show little change in the election’s race leaders, but tightening races for two Anchorage School Board seats.

With more than 72,600 ballots counted, mayoral candidate Dave Bronson still leads current Anchorage Assembly member Forrest Dunbar 23,597 votes to 22,238. The two are likely headed for a runoff election on May 11, as neither has secured the necessary 45% of the vote to win without one.

The runoff election will be official once the April 6 municipal election has been certified by the assembly.

The race for seat B on the Anchorage School Board is becoming increasingly close, with only 275 votes separating leader Kelly Lessens and fellow candidate Judy Eledge. Lessens has 24,454 votes to Eledge’s 24,179.

A margin of just 414 votes separates candidates in the race for the school board’s seat E. Pat Higgins is maintaining a lead with 20,651 votes to Sami Graham’s 20,237 votes.

While the mayoral race requires a runoff election if a single candidate cannot get 45% of the vote, school board races do not. The candidate with the majority of votes will win the seat.

Read the full updated results on the Alaska’s News Source election results page.

April 13 — 4:05 p.m.

Falsey endorses Dunbar in mayoral race

Mayoral candidate Bill Falsey, a former municipal attorney, has endorsed Forrest Dunbar for mayor of Anchorage, according to a press release from the Dunbar campaign.

Falsey has formally endorsed Dunbar for the likely May 11 runoff election. That election will be official when the April 6 municipal election is certified.

“Anchorage deserves someone in the mayor’s office with real experience, who knows how to bring people together and get things done; someone who understands that the mayor has both an obligation and opportunity to elevate our community by setting a tone of civility and respect,” Falsey said in the press release. “In my time as municipal attorney and municipal manager, I worked personally with Forrest. I know him to be a dedicated, productive, practical, forward-looking, solution-oriented leader, with the community’s best interests at heart. He is now the right choice for mayor.”

“I’m deeply honored to have the endorsement of Bill Falsey, and grateful for his long track record of public service and hard work on behalf of the people of Anchorage,” Dunbar said in the press release. “Bill ran his campaign on a vision of hastening our post-COVID economic recovery, creating a safe and thriving community, and developing a vibrant downtown. I look forward to championing those same values in the runoff race.”

April 12 — 9:26 p.m.

Dunbar files campaign finance complaint against Bronson

The campaign for Anchorage mayoral candidate Forrest Dunbar filed a complaint with the Alaska Public Offices Commission on Monday, alleging campaign finance regulation violations by opposing candidate Dave Bronson.

The complaint claims that Bronson’s campaign has more than $170,000 in non-compliant financial activity. Dunbar has asked the commission for expedited consideration of the complaint.

Read more: Dunbar campaign files complaint against Bronson alleging campaign finance regulation violations

April 12 — 5:48 p.m.

The latest election results are in

The Municipality of Anchorage has released more preliminary election results. Read them in full at Alaska’s News Source election results page.

The new results show David Bronson with 21,807 votes and Forrest Dunbar with 20,566.

April 9 — 6:34 p.m.

Deadline to register for likely runoff election is April 11

The deadline to register to vote in the likely mayoral runoff election between candidates Dave Bronson and Forrest Dunbar is approaching this weekend.

Both appear to be headed for a runoff election according to election results updated Friday by the Anchorage Municipal Clerk’s Office. Friday’s results show Bronson pulling ahead by a slim margin of 416 votes. He holds about 33% of the vote counted so far to Dunbar’s approximately 32%.

Neither holds the 45% plus one of the votes necessary to avoid a runoff. That runoff election won’t be official, though, until the April 6 municipal election is certified by the Anchorage Assembly on April 20, according to Municipal Clerk Barbara Jones. That’s when the runoff election will be confirmed, she wrote in a press release and confirmed via phone.

Read more: Deadline to register for likely runoff election is April 11

April 9 — 5:03 p.m.

Bronson pulls ahead of Dunbar in latest election results update

Candidate Dave Bronson has pulled slightly ahead of Forrest Dunbar in the race to become Anchorage’s next mayor.

Updated preliminary results from the city’s municipal election show Bronson now leading by a margin of 416 votes. Read the full updated results at Alaska’s News Source’s election results page.

Bronson now holds 32.49% of the vote counted so far, to Dunbar’s 31.77%. Neither holds the 45% of the vote necessary to avoid a runoff.

Anchorage Assembly Chair Felix Rivera still appears to have avoided being recalled, with more than 57% of votes counted so far having been cast to keep him.

The preliminary results show most propositions passing, with the exception of Proposition one for areawide facilities capital improvement projects, and Proposition eight, for Anchorage Metropolitan Police Service Area bonds. Both are failing according to the votes counted so far.

The deadline to register to vote or update voter registration for a potential May 11 runoff election is on or before Sunday, April 11, according to the Municipal Clerk’s Office.

April 9 — 12:15 p.m.

Election officials will continue counting ballots Saturday

The Municipal Clerk’s Office announced noon Friday that election officials will work at the Municipality of Anchorage Election Center Saturday from around 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Election officials will be processing ballot envelopes through the sorter and signature verification process, opening ballot envelopes, scanning ballots and tabulating results. The city clerk’s office anticipates additional results will be released Saturday.

Saturday’s work at the election center will be live-streamed on YouTube.

April 8 — 6:05 p.m.

Major races largely unchanged by new election results

Additional Anchorage municipal election results released Thursday evening by the clerk’s office show little change in the standings of the major races. Read the results so far for all major races and propositions on Alaska’s News Source’s elections results page.

Forrest Dunbar still holds a slight lead in the mayoral race with 16,458 votes to Dave Bronson’s 15,953. They hold 33% and 32% of the vote so far, respectively. To avoid a runoff election, a candidate needs to obtain 45% of the total vote.

Updated results show Assembly Chair Felix Rivera keeping his seat on the Anchorage Assembly at this time, with 3,417 people voting in favor of the recall and 4,653 voting against the recall, to keep him.

Proposition four, which would use funds to acquire vehicle and body cameras for Anchorage Police Department officers, among other information technology systems, is currently passing, according to preliminary results. More than 27,300 people have voted in favor of the measure, while 22,599 have voted against it.

Another proposition relating to purchases for police officers is currently failing. Proposition eight would replace fleet vehicles for the Anchorage Police Department and help implement capital improvements in the Anchorage Metropolitan Police Service Area.

That proposition is failing by a slim margin according to current preliminary results, with 25,092 people voting against it and 24,730 voting in favor.

April 7 — 9:20 p.m.

Corrections and stray marks on ballots slowed Tuesday’s count, election officials say

The need to review a large number of ballots with markings or corrections is part of what slowed counting down the night of Anchorage’s municipal election, according to the city’s top election official.

The Municipality of Anchorage released a second batch of election results earlier on Wednesday that showed election workers had tabulated 41,826 votes cast. That’s much closer to the total of 45,726 envelopes the city’s election center had received by the end of Monday, according to Municipal Clerk Barbara Jones.

She wrote in a press release that part of the reason so few votes cast were tabulated on election night — fewer than 11,000 — is that stray markings and corrections were on a significant number of the 30,000 mail-in ballots that the election workers scanned that night.

“Although there were various combinations, many of these ballots had the oval next to the selected candidate filled in, yet the ovals of all of the other candidates were also filled in and crossed off,” Jones wrote. “It wasn’t until the (election team) tabulated the results on Election Night and completed our review tonight, that we understood that this much larger number of ballots were sequestered and awaiting adjudication, or human review, resulting in the low number of total votes cast on Election Night.”

Now that adjudication of those sequestered ballots has happened, the results look a lot closer to what election workers would have expected on election night, Jones wrote.

Adjudication is part of the vote-by-mail process, Jones explained, in which a ballot needs to be reviewed by a person after being scanned. It’s important " because when voters vote at home and make a mistake, we want voters to be able to easily correct the mistake without obtaining a replacement ballot,” Jones wrote.

“Now that we understand this issue, we don’t expect it will slow us down in the rest of this election or in future elections,” she wrote.

The vote-by-mail system is designed to be secure, and includes measures throughout that are designed to prevent fraud, Jones explained, such as only mailing ballots to qualified registered voters with valid mailing addresses, and verifying signatures on the envelope with signatures in the voter registration database. Another measure is to confirm a high-level review of ballots with corrections before they are tabulated.

Jones more than 57,900 envelopes have been processed through the election center’s mail sorter as of Wednesday, and that the election center still has another estimated 15,000 envelopes still to process.

“It is difficult to estimate the exact timeline for ballot tabulation because after the envelopes are processed and the signatures are reviewed, the envelopes are opened and the ballots are separated,” Jones wrote. “Then the ballots are scanned, adjudicated, and tabulated. It is a long, detailed process but ensures the integrity of the election and confirms that every valid vote counts.”

Election workers will continue counting ballots from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

April 7 — 6:17 p.m.

Election Officials explain low vote count

Anchorage election officials are bringing more clarity to the process that led to a low vote count on Tuesday when the results from less than 11,000 ballots were released. Erika McConnell, Deputy Municipal Clerk, said several factors contributed including a large number of votes that were cast in the final days of the election.

“The most significant factor is how many ballots do we have at any given time,” said McConnell. “We had a lot of turnout this year which seemed to happen very late in the election. And we think that’s terrific, but when we get 10,000, 12,000, 13,000 ballots in a day, it takes us longer to finish all of those.”

Anchorage election officials are bringing more clarity to the process that led to a low vote count on Tuesday when the...

Posted by Alaska's News Source on Wednesday, April 7, 2021

READ MORE: Anchorage Election Officials explain low vote count Tuesday night

April 7 — 5:16 p.m.

Additional election results released

The Municipality of Anchorage has released a second batch of preliminary election results. Read them in full at the Alaska’s News Source Election Results page.

The updated unofficial results show more than 41,000 ballots counted out of the approximately 58,000 total ballots the clerk’s office received. Anchorage Municipal Clerk Barbara Jones wrote in a Tuesday night press release that the city had received about 45,726 envelopes by the end of Monday, and an additional estimated 13,000 on Tuesday.

When election workers finished for the night on Tuesday, they had counted just over 10,000 ballots.

Updated results show mayoral candidates Forrest Dunbar and Dave Bronson still in the lead. Dunbar has 13,711 votes to Bronson’s 12,986.

April 7 — 4:02 p.m.

Race to the runoff

Anchorage voters saw two mayoral candidates emerge as early leaders after the polls closed Tuesday and the first round of election results dropped.

Forrest Dunbar, ahead of the 15-candidate field with 3,701 votes, and Dave Bronson, just behind with 3,116 votes, appeared to be headed toward a highly anticipated runoff election — as it is unlikely any candidate will win the required 45% of the vote to become Anchorage’s next mayor.

As the evening ended, Bill Falsey had claimed 1,281 votes, Bill Evans earned 999, and Mike Robbins rounded out the top five candidates with 745 votes.

The early returns represented just over 10,000 votes, fewer than expected, and while some believe the writing on the wall is clear and expect to see Dunbar and Bronson face off in May, others say they’re holding out for more results.

READ MORE: Anchorage mayoral candidates eagerly await more election results

April 7 — 3:48 p.m.

Another round of election results expected by 5 p.m.

The next round of preliminary results for the Anchorage municipal election is expected to drop around 5 p.m. Wednesday.

The biggest story that came out of the initial results of Anchorage’s municipal elections was that there were few votes...

Posted by Alaska's News Source on Wednesday, April 7, 2021

April 7 — 7 a.m.

Only about 10,000 votes counted after election day

The biggest story that came out of the initial results of Anchorage’s municipal elections was that there were few votes counted Tuesday night, with just 10,438 ballots tallied.

According to the Anchorage Municipal Clerk’s office, 45,726 ballots were in the office leading into election day, and 13,000 were estimated to be received on election day. An announcement from the clerk’s office said they scanned approximately 30,000 votes, but only those 10,438 were officially adjudicated and counted.

READ MORE: ‘Things can swing wildly’: Only about 10,000 votes counted after election day

April 6 — 10 p.m.

Watch live: First round of preliminary results in for Anchorage municipal election

The first round of preliminary results for the Anchorage municipal election is in! Alaska’s News Source is bringing you live coverage of the race, including interviews with candidates and a breakdown of who is in the lead so far.

First round of preliminary results in for Anchorage municipal election

WATCH LIVE: The first round of preliminary results for the Anchorage municipal election is in! Alaska's News Source is bringing you live coverage of the race, including interviews with candidates and a breakdown of who is in the lead so far.

Posted by Alaska's News Source on Tuesday, April 6, 2021

April 6 — 9:38 p.m.

Roughly 58,000 ballots cast in municipal election

Members of Anchorage’s Municipal Elections Team will continue working to process and count the roughly 58,000 ballots cast in this year’s municipal election.

According to a Tuesday evening press release from Anchorage Municipal Clerk Barbara Jones, the city received more than 45,726 envelopes as of Monday, plus an estimated additional 13,000 on Election Day. While the team has scanned approximately 30,000 ballots, the release states that only 10,438 ballots have been fully adjudicated and counted thus far.

“There is certainly more to do and the Elections Team will be working daily” from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to process and tabulate the rest of the ballots, the release states.

April 6 — 9:18 p.m.

Initial round of results comes in

The first round of preliminary results in the Anchorage municipal election are in. You can read them in full at Alaska News Source’s Election Results page.

This initial round of results shows just over 10,430 ballots counted, out of more than 45,700 that were received by the city by the end of Monday. Final results will take several days to trickle in.

Correction: A previous version of this entry incorrectly stated the number of ballots that had been counted Tuesday night. There were 10,438 ballots counted.

April 6 — 8:54 p.m.

Candidates await results

Anchorage mayoral candidate Bill Evans was awaiting preliminary municipal election results with supporters Tuesday night at his watch party. Evans said he was looking forward to the campaign being done with, one way or the other.

Anchorage mayoral candidate Bill Evans awaits preliminary election results Tuesday night with...
Anchorage mayoral candidate Bill Evans awaits preliminary election results Tuesday night with supporters in Anchorage, Alaska.(Photo by Taylor Clark/Alaska's News Source)

Alaska’s News Source also caught the tail end of in-person voting in the city before the polls closed at 8 p.m.

April 6 — 8:25 p.m.

Polls have closed on the municipal election

The polls closed at 8 p.m. and voting in this year’s Anchorage municipal election is officially done. The initial round of preliminary results are due to be published tonight.

Anchorage mayoral candidate Dave Bronson thanks campaign volunteers as the polls close at his...
Anchorage mayoral candidate Dave Bronson thanks campaign volunteers as the polls close at his watch party in the Spenard neighborhood of Anchorage, Alaska.(Photo by Daniella Rivera/Alaska's News Source)

Full results will take several days to trickle in.

April 6 — 6:27 p.m.

Anchorage Votes team coverage

Alaska’s News Source is bringing you Election Day coverage as voters turn in their ballots.

April 6 — 4:44 p.m.

Staying in line to cast her ballot

A voter in Midtown says she waited in line to cast her ballot for over an hour.

“It’s important to vote, so I waited.”

She added that voting is important.

April 6 — 4:29 p.m.

Candidates in their own words

Interested in what candidates running for mayor and a seat on the school board in Anchorage’s municipal election had to say about their campaigns?

Read their answers to the Alaska’s News Source candidate questionnaire. We reached out to Elisa Vakalis, Marcus Sanders and Dan Loring, but none completed their candidate questionnaires before the final deadline for publication.

READ MORE: Candidate Q&A

April 6 — 3:50 p.m.

Thousands of Anchorage residents have already cast their vote

Municipality of Anchorage Deputy Municipal Clerk Erika McConnell said Tuesday afternoon that, so far, the municipality had received 45,726 ballots by the end of Monday. The clerk’s office received 11,554 ballots on Monday alone, but that number included ballots put in drop boxes over the weekend.

Municipality of Anchorage Deputy Municipal Clerk Erika McConnell said Tuesday afternoon that, so far, the municipality...

Posted by Alaska's News Source on Tuesday, April 6, 2021

April 6 — 3:30 p.m.

Still time to vote

Plenty of people have weighed in that they’ve already cast their vote in the Anchorage municipal election. If you haven’t , you have until 8 p.m. at the following locations:

  • City Hall, 632 West 6th Avenue, Room #155
  • Eagle River Town Center, 12001 Business Boulevard, Community Room #170
  • Loussac Library, 3600 Denali Street, 1st Floor, Assembly Chambers

April 6 — 3 p.m.

Keeping Anchorage’s vote-by-mail elections secure

Today, Anchorage residents will vote to elect a new mayor, several school board seats, various propositions and bonds. For the fourth year in a row, they received their ballots in the mail.

Deputy Municipal Clerk Erika McConnell said there are numerous security measures in place to ensure that mail-in balloting is safe, secure and accurate.

READ MORE: Keeping Anchorage’s vote-by-mail elections safe and secure

April 6 — 2:30 p.m.

Ballot proposition two

Of the over $1.1 million budgeted for proposition two, $500,000 will pay for the creation of an Alaska room and restoring other areas of the Loussac Library. Plus, passage of proposition two would secure a $390,000 federal challenge grant and $700,000 in private donations.

Some of the $350,000 the Anchorage Senior Activity Center would receive from proposition two would go for a new garage; the rest is for safety improvements. The Chugiak-Eagle River Senior Center could also get an upgrade. It would receive the remaining $300,000 from the measure. Most of the money would be used to renovate the apartments.

Work on all the buildings could start this summer. First though, Anchorage voters have to approve the proposition.

READ MORE: Loussac Library, senior centers to benefit from proposition two

April 6 — 1:55 p.m.

Ballot proposition one

The first proposition that voters will be asked to authorize during Anchorage’s 2021 municipal election would generate almost $7 million to assist with various upgrades and improvements to existing municipal facilities. It would cost voters around $1.47 per $100,000 in assessed property value.

According to the director of the municipality’s office of management and budget, Lance Wilbur, proposition one is about residents being able to take care of the facilities that were already approved through previous bond packages.

READ MORE: Municipal budget office says ballot proposition one is needed to maintain city assets

April 6 — 1:20 p.m.

Candidate profiles: School Board Seat E

The race for several seats on the Anchorage School Board is a crowded one. In the 2021 Municipal Election, four of the seven member spots are up for grabs, positioning those running to be part of a group that will undoubtedly help shape the future of the board and district itself.

For all four seats, 16 candidates total remain on the ballot, but of those, six are vying for a single seat: Anchorage School Board Seat E.

The candidates include Rachel Blakeslee, Edgar Blatchford, Sami Graham, and Nial Sherwood Williams, as well as former school board member Pat Higgins and incumbent Alisha Hilde, who was elected in 2018.

All of them have their own visions for the Anchorage School District and the board itself.

READ MORE: Meet the candidates running for Anchorage School Board Seat E

April 6 — 1:01 p.m.

Candidate profiles: School Board Seat B

Anchorage voters have four candidates to choose from to fill Anchorage School Board Seat B: Kelly Lessens, Judy Eledge, Mark Anthony Cox and Marilyn Stewart.

Each candidate’s unique experiences intersect with education, and all four of them have ideas about how to move the school district forward.

READ MORE: Meet the candidates running for Anchorage School Board Seat B

April 6 — 12:40 p.m.

Early start on Election Day

Voters and supports had an early start to their Tuesday casting votes and rallying support for their candidate in Anchorage’s regular municipal election.

One woman our photojournalist talked with said it took her over an hour to get through the line.

April 6 — 12:21 p.m.

Mayoral candidates share thoughts on homelessness, housing

In the woods and under bridges, homeless camps and the people who live outside has been an issue that has frustrated, saddened and angered people in Anchorage for several years.

In 2019, Anchorage saw about 7,900 incidences of homelessness, according to the Anchorage Coalition to End Homelessness. That number, and shelter use, increased during the coronavirus pandemic.

In February, six mayoral candidates participated in a discussion about homelessness and the issues that surround it, including affordable housing.

READ MORE: What 6 Anchorage mayoral candidates would do to end homeless camps

April 6 — 11:52 a.m.

Candidate profile: George Martinez

George Martinez believes the next mayor of Anchorage must bring people together in order to move the city forward, and he believes he’s the right person for the job.

“I’m running for mayor because the future of my family depends on the future of this city,” he said during a sit-down interview with Alaska’s News Source.

Martinez says his campaign’s message is one of unity.

READ MORE: George Martinez wants to bring the community together and move Anchorage forward

April 6 — 11:31 a.m.

Candidate profile: Mike Robbins

Anchorage mayoral hopeful Mike Robbins says he has a plan for a path forward for the city, with a particular focus on helping businesses boom and improving infrastructure across the municipality.

“I’ve spent my entire life creating payroll, not catching a paycheck,” he said in an interview earlier this month. “And that doesn’t make me better or worse than anyone else; it just makes me different. It gives me a different perspective and a different approach to how I’ll run this city.

“I understand budgets, I understand bottom lines, I understand efficiencies,” he added. “I built several companies from the ground up, and I think that makes me the best-qualified candidate to help move the city forward as we move into the future.”

READ MORE: Mike Robbins banking on business to create cleaner, safer, more prosperous Anchorage

April 6 — 11:06 a.m.

Candidate profile: Bill Falsey

Mayoral candidate Bill Falsey has worked within the Municipality of Anchorage offices since 2015. He started as a municipal attorney and eventually became the municipal manager.

“I oversaw nine departments, three utilities, two enterprises and four offices,” Falsey said. “I’m the only candidate running that has significant executive and local government experience and I want to put that to work.”

Falsey stepped down from his role as Anchorage’s municipal manager late last year so that he could focus on a run for the mayor’s office.

READ MORE: Bill Falsey says he knows what it takes to run Anchorage

April 6 — 10:34 a.m.

Candidate profile: Bill Evans

Sleep has come at a premium these days for Bill Evans.

“There’s a lot (of) events, a lot of forums, a lot of people are interested in talking to the candidates,” Evans said during a recent event at his campaign headquarters. “We try to make an effort to talk to every group that wants to talk to us.”

Evans spent one term on the Anchorage Assembly from 2014 to 2017. He now has his sights on a higher office — mayor of Anchorage.

READ MORE: Bill Evans urges reopening economy, making Anchorage more business friendly

April 6 — 10:06 a.m.

Candidate profile: Forrest Dunbar

Forrest Dunbar, one of 15 candidates running for mayor of Anchorage, has a simple answer for why he’s running.

“I’m running to get Anchorage past our current public health crisis and get our economy back on track,” Dunbar said in an interview last week.

His plan for either of those things, however, is much more involved.

READ MORE: Forrest Dunbar is eager to work with Alaskans, get city ‘back on track’

April 6 — 9:41 a.m.

Candidate profile: Dave Bronson

In a crowded field of mayoral candidates, Dave Bronson says his years of leadership experience as an Air Force veteran make him the right choice to move Anchorage past the COVID-19 pandemic.

If elected, Bronson plans to immediately roll back the emergency orders that have been in place over the course of the pandemic.

“First and foremost, We’ve got to end the shutdown, and then we’ve got to immediately start dealing with the other problems we are facing,” he said.

READ MORE: Dave Bronson aims to take Anchorage in new direction

April 6 — 9:18 a.m.

Anticipating a runoff

Crowded elections with big personalities are nothing new in Anchorage. Neither are runoff campaigns.

This time around there are 15 candidates who want to be the mayor of Anchorage. If no one locks in more than 45% of the vote, the two candidates who receive the most votes will be placed on the runoff ballot.

READ MORE: All of our preparations involve the anticipation for a runoff election

April 6 — 8:55 a.m.

Meet the candidates

Alaska’s News Source previously reached out to candidates running for mayor and a seat on the school board in Anchorage’s municipal election.

All candidates were asked the same questions and their answers have been posted on our website for voters to read and use as a resource before deciding who to vote for in the election.

These candidates are all actively campaigning, have a related website and are actively raising money.

READ MORE: Meet the candidates running for mayor, school board in the municipal election

April 6 — 8:23 a.m.

Here’s what to expect

This election cycle is huge, crowded with candidates that will all face daunting tasks. The next mayor faces an ongoing economic crisis, reopening schools, the coronavirus pandemic, vocal critics of the citywide coronavirus shutdown and a shrinking population.

There are 15 candidates to become the next mayor of Anchorage, plus four open school board seats and 11 propositions on this year’s ballot including several bonds.

And, for some voters — District 4 — there’s the recall vote for Anchorage Assembly Chair Felix Rivera.

READ MORE: Here’s what to expect from the election in Anchorage

April 6 — 8 a.m.

It’s Election Day

Tuesday is the last day for voters to cast their ballots in Anchorage’s regular municipal election. Three voting centers are open for anyone who wishes to vote in person:

  • City Hall, 632 West 6th Avenue, Room #155
    • Election Day: 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Eagle River Town Center, 12001 Business Boulevard, Community Room #170
    • Election Day: 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Loussac Library, 3600 Denali Street, 1st Floor, Assembly Chambers
    • Election Day: 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Voters who choose to vote by mail Tuesday will need to ask a postal worker to “hand cancel” or place a postmark on their envelope to make sure their votes count, according to the municipality’s website.

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